Obama Ipsum

The most presidential lorem ipsum in history.

How many paragraphs of oratory do you need?

And I've found that no matter where I am, or who I'm talking to, there's a common theme that emerges. In the following century, men and women of faith waded into the battles over prison reform and temperance, public education and women's rights - and above all, abolition. These are the Americans that I know.

It's that he spoke as if our society was static; as if no progress has been made; as if this country - a country that has made it possible for one of his own members to run for the highest office in the land and build a coalition of white and black; Latino and Asian, rich and poor, young and old - is still irrevocably bound to a tragic past. It is that promise that has always set this country apart - that through hard work and sacrifice, each of us can pursue our individual dreams but still come together as one American family, to ensure that the next generation can pursue their dreams as well. We measure the strength of our economy not by the number of billionaires we have or the profits of the Fortune 500, but by whether someone with a good idea can take a risk and start a new business, or whether the waitress who lives on tips can take a day off to look after a sick kid without losing her job - an economy that honors the dignity of work.

So one Sunday, I put on one of the few clean jackets I had, and went over to Trinity United Church of Christ on 95th Street on the South Side of Chicago. And when I hear a woman talk about the difficulties of starting her own business, I think about my grandmother, who worked her way up from the secretarial pool to middle-management, despite years of being passed over for promotions because she was a woman. Kennedy called our "intellectual and moral strength." Yes, government must lead on energy independence, but each of us must do our part to make our homes and businesses more efficient. Let me also address the issue of Iraq.

Just as black anger often proved counterproductive, so have these white resentments distracted attention from the real culprits of the middle class squeeze - a corporate culture rife with inside dealing, questionable accounting practices, and short-term greed; a Washington dominated by lobbyists and special interests; economic policies that favor the few over the many. This same story can be told by people from South Africa to South Asia; from Eastern Europe to Indonesia.

His father - my grandfather - was a cook, a domestic servant to the British. We cannot walk alone. The fear and anger that it provoked was understandable, but in some cases, it led us to act contrary to our ideals. Fear that because of modernity we will lose of control over our economic choices, our politics, and most importantly our identities - those things we most cherish about our communities, our families, our traditions, and our faith.

Thank you, God Bless you, and God Bless the United States of America.